December Security Report

Information Security Report – December 2017

Over the past month, we have seen a number of threats, vulnerabilities, and spear phishing attacks affecting organisations worldwide. Read on for a summary of these events to help you assess their implication on your environment.

Threats and Exploits


Mailsploit Allows Spoofed Mails to Fool DMARC. Mailsploit is a collection of vulnerabilities in various email clients which allow an attacker to perform code injection attacks, spoof senders and bypass email protection mechanisms such as DMARC(DKIM/SPF). The security researcher who developed Mailsploit described how Mailsploit allows an attacker to send emails from any address they choose by taking advantage of how servers validate the DKIM signature of the original domain and not the spoofed one. It has been reported that this technique does not currently get detected or blocked by the majority of mail client vendors.

All major email clients and web mail vendors were notified about Mailsploit prior to its public release, however a large number of popular clients still remain vulnerable.

The list of impacted mail clients can be found here >>

It is recommended that users should update their email client whenever there’s a software update available, use end-to-end encrypted messages for personal conversations and at work and/or use PGP/GPG to verify the identities and encrypt email contents.

You can read more on Mailsploit on info security magazine and

Spear Phishing

Huge Increase in Email Impersonation Attacks: According to Email Security Risk Assessment (ESRA) report, a report released byMimecast Data Security, it was discovered that although organisations continue to face an ongoing threat from malware, the fastest growing threat is impersonation attacks. An organisation is seven times more likely to be hit by an impersonation attack than by email-borne malware. These attacks are also known as whaling or spear phishing where attackers trick recipients into wiring money transfers to the fraudster. These scams are highly targeted and often done after a cybercriminal has gathered enough information to send the right person the right message. These attacks continue to grow faster than malware due to the fact that it’s very hard for traditional defenses like email filters to detect them.

Good user training will give an edge in avoiding most of these payment and impersonation scams. A few other tips for security teams to help combat the social engineering threat include:

  • Conducting internal phishing by phishing your own employees and sharing the results of the testing with them so that they can learn what to look out for. This should be combines with good training on how the users can detect the phishing emails.
  • Impersonation attacks often try to mimic emails from C-level executives. Implement a company policy that closes scam avenues for would-be spear phishers (e.g., never request the sharing of sensitive documents via email).
  • Disable links inside email bodies to force users to manually navigate to the site mentioned in the email. It adds extra steps, but it can prevent a user from clicking on a phishing link by accident.

Read more on info security magazine and TechRepublic


Security News and Alerts

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Virtual Keyboard App Data Breach

Massive Breach Exposes Keyboard App that Collects Personal Data on its 31 Million Users. A team of security researchers have discovered a huge trove of personal data of the users of the virtual keyboard app ‘AI.type’ that was accidentally leaked online for any one to download. This app is a customization for on-screen keyboards on mobile phones and tablets with more than 40 million users worldwide. It is reported that the app requests for ‘full access’ to all user data stored on the phone and appears to collect everything from contacts to keystrokes. The leaked data includes full names, phone numbers, email addresses, device information including device name, screen resolution, model details, android version, mobile network name, country of residence, GPS location and even links and information associated with social media profiles.

Events such as this raise the question about what permissions mobile applications have on our devices (and just how much access these applications NEED). In order to best protect yourself against this form of application privilege abuse, it is recommended to always read and be cautious of what access is granted to applications.

Read more on The Hacker News

Uber Technologies Data Breach

Personal data of 57 million customers and drivers was stolen last year from ride-sharing company Uber with the breach revealed to have been concealed by the company for more than a year. It is suggested that the company paid $100,000 to the attackers. The company however advised that no social security numbers, credit card information, trip location details or other data were taken. Uber is being condemned for how it chose to deal with the issue after discovery of the attack and has also been sued for negligence over the breach by a customer.

It is reported that two attackers were able to retrieve login credentials from a private GitHub coding site which they used to access Uber data from an Amazon Web Services account where they discovered customer and driver related information. Although there are state and federal laws in the United States that require companies to alert people and government agencies when sensitive data breaches occur, Uber failed to comply.


Breach at PayPal Subsidiary Affects 1.6 Million Customers. Paypal disclosed on 1st December 2017 a data breach on its recently acquired company TIO Networks. Personal information for 1.6 million individuals may have been compromised. TIO is based in Canada and serves some of the largest telecom and utility network operator in North America. Paypal pointed out that the Paypal platform has not been impacted as the TIO systems have not been integrated into its own platform. Paypal advised that affected companies and individuals would be contacted via mail and email, and offered free credit monitoring services via Experian. The data breach was discovered as part of ongoing investigations for identifying vulnerabilities in the processing platform.


Other News

Simulated Attacks Uncover Real-World Problems in IT Security. A research report by SafeBreach, a cybersecurity company that has developed a platform that simulates hacker breach methods, reveals that virtual hackers “have a 60% success rate of using malware to infiltrate networks. And once in, the malware could move laterally almost 70% of the time. In half the cases, they could exit networks with data.” The research found that it was not hard to get past the perimeter and once in, it was easy for attackers to move around and exfiltrate data. This is because most organisations overlook concerns over lateral movement as they mostly focus on the perimeter.

According to the report, malware infiltration methods like nesting or “packing” malware executables were effective in bypassing security controls 50% of the time. The success rate of infiltrating a network using packed executables was found to be 55%-61% using JavaScript, VBScript (VBS) using HTTP and using HTML file format (CHM) extension. It is recommended that network security controls should be VBScript (VBS) using HTTP and using HTML file format (CHM) extension. It is recommended that network controls should be configured to scan for malicious files and block them before they make their way to the endpoints/hosts for installation to disk. The report
further outlines how cybercriminals exfiltrate data using the easiest methods which are often through traditional clear or encrypted Web traffic. Ports having the highest exfiltration success rate include Port 443 (HTTPS) and Port 123 (NTP).

It is recommended that in order to better protect resources, organisations should optimize their current security solutions, constantly update the configurations as needed, and then test the changes they make.